Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1088/1757-899X/370/1/012025
Title: Improving Coolant Effectiveness through Drill Design Optimization in Gundrilling
Authors: Woon K.S. 
Tnay G.L.
Rahman M. 
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Institute of Physics Publishing
Citation: Woon K.S., Tnay G.L., Rahman M. (2018). Improving Coolant Effectiveness through Drill Design Optimization in Gundrilling. IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering 370 (1) : 1-9. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1088/1757-899X/370/1/012025
Abstract: Effective coolant application is essential to prevent thermo-mechanical failures of gun drills. This paper presents a novel study that enhances coolant effectiveness in evacuating chips from the cutting zone using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. Drag coefficients and transport behaviour over a wide range of Reynold numbers were first established through a series of vertical drop tests. With these, a CFD model was then developed and calibrated with a set of horizontal drilling tests. Using this CFD model, critical drill geometries that lead to poor chip evacuation including the nose grind contour, coolant hole configuration and shoulder dub-off angle in commercial gun drills are identified. From this study, a new design that consists a 20° inner edge, 15° outer edge, 0° shoulder dub-off and kidney-shaped coolant channel is proposed and experimentally proven to be more superior than all other commercial designs. © Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd.
Source Title: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/152503
ISSN: 17578981
DOI: 10.1088/1757-899X/370/1/012025
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