Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/151873
Title: ROLE OF IONS IN ULTRAHIGH WORKFUNCTION P-DOPED POLYELECTROLYTES FOR ORGANIC ELECTRONICS
Authors: ANG CHUNYI MERVIN
ORCID iD:   orcid.org/0000-0002-4420-9637
Keywords: Polymer, polyelectrolyte, workfunction, doping, hole injection layer, organic semiconductors
Issue Date: 4-Apr-2018
Citation: ANG CHUNYI MERVIN (2018-04-04). ROLE OF IONS IN ULTRAHIGH WORKFUNCTION P-DOPED POLYELECTROLYTES FOR ORGANIC ELECTRONICS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This thesis focuses on the development of a family of self-compensated (SC) ultrahigh workfunction p-doped polymers which are formed by p-doping fluorene-triarylamine polyelectrolytes with sacrificial dopants, followed by excess ion removal. These excess ions, if present, causes device instability due to dopant ion migration. Both tethered counter-anion and spectator cations are varied in this work to study the ion effects on physico-chemical properties of these SC p-doped polymers. We found that the choice of ions indeed influences workfunction, ambient and thermal stability of these p-doped films. Further, we demonstrated the application of SC p-doped polymers as ohmic hole injection layers in organic diode devices with deep ionization potential light-emitting polymers. In the diode device configuration, we show that these p-doped polymers have sufficient resilience to de-doping, which allows ambient processing and standard device baking conditions, hence are suitable for deployment in industry. These new insights on role of ions in these SC p-doped polymers provide useful design rules for development of ambient-stable p-doped polymers with even more extreme workfunctions for advanced semiconductor applications.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/151873
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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