Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/151219
Title: PHILIPPINE HYBRID HOKKIEN AS A POSTCOLONIAL MIXED LANGUAGE: EVIDENCE FROM NOMINAL DERIVATIONAL AFFIXATION MIXING
Authors: WILKINSON DANIEL WONG GONZALES
ORCID iD:   orcid.org/0000-0001-6073-256X
Keywords: language contact, Chinese Filipino, acceptability judgments, mixed language, Philippine Hybrid Hokkien
Issue Date: 21-Aug-2018
Citation: WILKINSON DANIEL WONG GONZALES (2018-08-21). PHILIPPINE HYBRID HOKKIEN AS A POSTCOLONIAL MIXED LANGUAGE: EVIDENCE FROM NOMINAL DERIVATIONAL AFFIXATION MIXING. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This thesis investigates nominal derivational affixation mixing in Philippine Hybrid Hokkien (PHH), a Hokkien-based (Southern Min) mixed code of the (Manila) Chinese Filipino community that has features of Tagalog and English. Using an experimental approach, it shows the affixation mixing acceptability judgments of 63 Chinese Filipinos and subjects them statistical analyses using linear mixed-effects regression modeling. Findings demonstrate that, in the context of mixing, Chinese Filipinos have high judgments for one or two-syllable Tagalog prefixes. Results also show that age is a significant predictor of such mixing. Complemented by actual spontaneous data involving affix mixing, the consistency of these judgments across individual participants and social groups supports the notion that PHH is not merely a case of extensive code-switching, but could be, in fact, a mixed language. Overall, the findings demonstrate widespread acceptance and conventionalization among all but the oldest members of the community, suggesting that PHH could have emerged around the 1950s.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/151219
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Open)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
GonzalesWDW.pdf4.92 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

Page view(s)

761
checked on Jun 23, 2022

Download(s)

148
checked on Jun 23, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.