Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/150015
Title: PROBLEM OF MARINE INVASIVE SPECIES AND THEIR IMPACT ON SINGAPORE WATERS
Authors: MANOJ KUMAR PUTHIA
Issue Date: 2003
Citation: MANOJ KUMAR PUTHIA (2003). PROBLEM OF MARINE INVASIVE SPECIES AND THEIR IMPACT ON SINGAPORE WATERS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The introduction of invasive marine species into new environments by ships' ballast water, ships' hulls and via other means has been identified as one of the four greatest threats to the biodiversity of the world's oceans. The other three are land-based sources of marine pollution, overexploitation of living marine resources and physical alteration/destruction of marine habitat. In my study an attempt was made to analyze the present status of problems of invasive marine species in Singapore waters and relate this to global context. Most countries are being affected by the adverse impact of the invasive marine species. Developed countries (most affected) are responding to this crisis by introducing national legislations, adopting new technologies and by researching into the subject. International organizations are responsibly playing their part by planning to impose effective legislation to prevent international spread of invasive marine species. Numerous research projects are underway to identify the alien species, to determine their potential impacts, and to discover effective ballast water treatment technologies. Taking advantage of the World Wide Web facility, hundreds of web sites are playing their part in increasing awareness and in providing useful baseline information regarding invasive species. Studies reveal that so far no detailed research has been done in Singapore to ascertain or understand the status of alien species in its waters. Officially only, one species of alien mussel (Ng & Sivasothi, 1999; CSIRO, 2000) and a couple of species of toxic dinoflagellate have been found in Singapore waters thus far (Holmes, 1998; Holmes et al., 2002) These species have already shown their adverse impacts in other parts of the world and they are potentially harmful here as well. There is currently, no regulation on the discharge of ballast water or to prevent the introduction of alien species into Singapore waters. Studies show that Singapore is particularly vulnerable to this problem (Holmes & Teo, 2002). There is thus a need to establish some regulations to prevent the introduction of alien marine species. However, local baseline information on the native marine species is inadequate and extensive research work is required. Hence, to evaluate the impacts of alien marine species, appropriate research is deemed necessary
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/150015
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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