Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147110
Title: IMPLICATIONS OF EARLY ADOLESCENTS' PARENT-ORIENTED SELF-CONSTRUAL FOR THEIR ADJUSTMENT: MODERATING ROLE OF PERCEIVED ACADEMIC COMPETENCE
Authors: ABIGAIL LIM SU ANN
Keywords: adolescent, parent-oriented self-construal, academic competence, adjustment
Issue Date: 13-Apr-2018
Citation: ABIGAIL LIM SU ANN (2018-04-13). IMPLICATIONS OF EARLY ADOLESCENTS' PARENT-ORIENTED SELF-CONSTRUAL FOR THEIR ADJUSTMENT: MODERATING ROLE OF PERCEIVED ACADEMIC COMPETENCE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This longitudinal study examined the implications of early adolescents’ parent-oriented self-construals and perceived academic ability on academic adjustment as reflected in various dimensions of engagement, and emotional adjustment as reflected in anxiety and depression across the United States (n = 420) and China (n = 514), across three waves spanning a year and a half. Results showed that only American adolescents with better academic selfperceptions showed more behavioural and affective engagement with increasing parentoriented self-construals, while those with poorer academic self-perceptions reported more anxiety if they also had high parent-oriented self-construals. However, Chinese adolescents with poor academic self-perceptions reported more behavioural engagement and less depression when they also had high parent-oriented self-construals. These findings point to the contrary effects of parent-oriented self-construal in China as compared to the United States. Parent-oriented self-construal appears to be more advantageous and less adverse in China, a culture supportive of interdependence, than in the US, a culture that prizes independent abilities and achievements. Thus, this calls for future research to examine how adolescents’ adjustments can be better supported in line with their cultural norms.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147110
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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