Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/142122
Title: MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY OF BACTERIAL-FUNGAL MIXED-SPECIES BIOFILMS AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS
Authors: KASSAPA JAYO BANDARA ELLEPOLA
ORCID iD:   orcid.org/0000-0003-3806-9807
Keywords: Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Biofilms, Glucosyltransferase, Dental caries
Issue Date: 17-Jan-2018
Citation: KASSAPA JAYO BANDARA ELLEPOLA (2018-01-17). MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY OF BACTERIAL-FUNGAL MIXED-SPECIES BIOFILMS AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen in humans. C. albicans forms mixed-species biofilms with bacterial counterparts in various infectious diseases. The work presented in this thesis aimed to understand the molecular mechanisms governing the inter-kingdom biofilms and their clinical implications. Comprehensive OMICS biology approaches such as transcriptomics and proteomics techniques were employed to unravel the molecular pathways involved in these mixed-species biofilms. C. albicans and Streptococcus mutans mixed-species biofilms were studied as a fungal-gram positive bacterial model. S. mutans derived exoenzyme “glucosyltransferase B” (GtfB) was found to augment C. albicans in mixed-species biofilms, explaining its role in the development of early childhood caries. Frequently found in cystic fibrosis patients, C. albicans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa mixed-species biofilms were used as a model system for fungal-gram negative bacterial interactions. P. aeruginosa was able to inhibit C. albicans and the underlying molecular mechanisms revealed relevant information on enhanced virulence of these organisms in mixed-biofilms.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/142122
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Ellepola KJB.pdf6.29 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

Page view(s)

86
checked on Jul 19, 2019

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.