Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/138822
Title: SELF-ORGANIZATION OF CLATHRIN MEDIATED ENDOCYTOSIS INTO SPATIOTEMPORAL WAVES AND THE ONSET OF CORTICAL PATTERNING
Authors: YANG YANG
Keywords: membrane:endocytosis:collective dynamics:single-cell patterns: BAR: spiral waves
Issue Date: 17-Aug-2017
Citation: YANG YANG (2017-08-17). SELF-ORGANIZATION OF CLATHRIN MEDIATED ENDOCYTOSIS INTO SPATIOTEMPORAL WAVES AND THE ONSET OF CORTICAL PATTERNING. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Assembly of the endocytic machinery is a constitutively active process that is important for the organization of the plasma membrane, signal transduction, and membrane trafficking. Existing research has focused on the stochastic nature of endocytosis. Here, we report the emergence of the collective dynamics of endocytic proteins as periodic traveling waves. Coordinated clathrin assembly provides the earliest spatial cue for cortical waves and sets the direction of propagation. Surprisingly, the onset of clathrin waves, but not individual endocytic events, requires feedback from downstream factors, including FBP17, Cdc42, and N-WASP, and intermediate phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) level as a determinant of such feedback. In addition to the localized endocytic assembly at the plasma membrane, intracellular clathrin and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P2) predict the excitability of the plasma membrane and modulate the geometry of traveling waves. Moreover, for further understanding of the biological function of endocytic waves, we identified cargoes that are specific to the wave-related endocytic pathway through SILAC assay.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/138822
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