Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/136184
Title: A CONTINUOUS AND SCALABLE BOTTOM-UP PROCESS TO PRODUCE NANOPARTICLE FORMULATIONS FOR ENHANCED DRUG DELIVERY
Authors: HU JUN
Keywords: Bottom-up, Nanoparticle, Nanoformulation, Liquid Antisolvent Precipitation, Immediate (on-line) Spray Drying, Enhanced Drug Delivery
Issue Date: 18-Jan-2017
Citation: HU JUN (2017-01-18). A CONTINUOUS AND SCALABLE BOTTOM-UP PROCESS TO PRODUCE NANOPARTICLE FORMULATIONS FOR ENHANCED DRUG DELIVERY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The aim of this study was to develop a process to produce pharmaceutical nanoformulations. A process was designed which can be used as a proof-of-concept at lab scale to mimic a process of continuous liquid antisolvent precipitation followed by immediate (on-line) spray drying. Feasibility studies were carried out on three model drugs (i.e. fenofibrate, budesonide and sodium cromoglicate). Through the proposed process, nanoformulations of two poorly water-soluble drugs (i.e. fenofibrate and budesonide) with lactose or mannitol as the matrix excipient and excipient-free nanoformulation of one water-soluble drug (i.e. sodium cromoglicate) were successfully produced. Characterization and comparison studies confirmed that the nanoformulations of these drugs exhibited much improved dissolution properties and/or enhanced aerosol performance as compared with conventional formulations containing microsized drug particles, indicating the potential of coupling liquid antisolvent precipitation with immediate (on-line) spray drying for the continuous and scalable production of pharmaceutical nanoformulations to achieve enhanced oral/pulmonary delivery.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/136184
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
HuJ.pdf3.64 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

Page view(s)

120
checked on Dec 1, 2022

Download(s)

15
checked on Dec 1, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.