Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/136184
Title: A CONTINUOUS AND SCALABLE BOTTOM-UP PROCESS TO PRODUCE NANOPARTICLE FORMULATIONS FOR ENHANCED DRUG DELIVERY
Authors: HU JUN
Keywords: Bottom-up, Nanoparticle, Nanoformulation, Liquid Antisolvent Precipitation, Immediate (on-line) Spray Drying, Enhanced Drug Delivery
Issue Date: 18-Jan-2017
Citation: HU JUN (2017-01-18). A CONTINUOUS AND SCALABLE BOTTOM-UP PROCESS TO PRODUCE NANOPARTICLE FORMULATIONS FOR ENHANCED DRUG DELIVERY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The aim of this study was to develop a process to produce pharmaceutical nanoformulations. A process was designed which can be used as a proof-of-concept at lab scale to mimic a process of continuous liquid antisolvent precipitation followed by immediate (on-line) spray drying. Feasibility studies were carried out on three model drugs (i.e. fenofibrate, budesonide and sodium cromoglicate). Through the proposed process, nanoformulations of two poorly water-soluble drugs (i.e. fenofibrate and budesonide) with lactose or mannitol as the matrix excipient and excipient-free nanoformulation of one water-soluble drug (i.e. sodium cromoglicate) were successfully produced. Characterization and comparison studies confirmed that the nanoformulations of these drugs exhibited much improved dissolution properties and/or enhanced aerosol performance as compared with conventional formulations containing microsized drug particles, indicating the potential of coupling liquid antisolvent precipitation with immediate (on-line) spray drying for the continuous and scalable production of pharmaceutical nanoformulations to achieve enhanced oral/pulmonary delivery.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/136184
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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