Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/133378
Title: Intraperitoneal vancomycin/oral pefloxacin versus intraperitoneal vancomycin/gentamicin in the treatment of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis peritonitis
Authors: Lye, W.-C.
Lee, E.J.C. 
van der Straaten, J.
Keywords: Gentamicin
Pefloxacin
Peritonitis
Vancomycin
Issue Date: 1993
Citation: Lye, W.-C., Lee, E.J.C., van der Straaten, J. (1993). Intraperitoneal vancomycin/oral pefloxacin versus intraperitoneal vancomycin/gentamicin in the treatment of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis peritonitis. Peritoneal Dialysis International 13 (SUPPL. 2) : S348-S350. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Sixty patients were enrolled in a prospective, randomized study to evaluate the efficacy of two different regimens for the empirical treatment of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis. At presentation, Group I received intraperitoneal vancomycin (1 g) and oral pefloxacin (400 mg b.i.d.), and Group II intraperitoneal vancomycin (1 g) and gentamicin (80 mg loading dose, followed by 15 mg/2 L). Treatment duration was 14 days. Despite randomization, Group I had significantly more patients with primary Candida peritonitis. When fungal peritonitis was excluded from analysis, there were no significant differences in the treatment success rate (Group I, 73.3% vs Group II, 80.0%, p=NS), number of relapses (Group I, 0 vs Group II,1), and Tenckhoff catheter removal rates (Group I, 26.6% vs Group II,16.6%, p=NS) between the two groups. The patients treated with pefloxacin had an increased incidence of nausea and vomiting. In selected situations oral pefloxacin may be a suitable substitute for intraperitoneal gentamicin as outpatient therapy for CAPD peritonitis.
Source Title: Peritoneal Dialysis International
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/133378
ISSN: 08968608
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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