Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1843.2003.00442.x
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dc.titlePrescribing and administration of nebulized bronchodilators: A prospective audit in a university hospital
dc.contributor.authorKhoo, S.M.
dc.contributor.authorLim, T.K.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-28T10:14:36Z
dc.date.available2016-11-28T10:14:36Z
dc.date.issued2003-06
dc.identifier.citationKhoo, S.M., Lim, T.K. (2003-06). Prescribing and administration of nebulized bronchodilators: A prospective audit in a university hospital. Respirology 8 (2) : 205-207. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1843.2003.00442.x
dc.identifier.issn13237799
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/130955
dc.description.abstractObjective: Inaccurate and incomplete prescribing of nebulized bronchodilators can result in uncertainty and suboptimal treatment. A prospective study was carried out to assess the completeness of prescription and the quality of bronchodilator drug administration via nebulizers. Methodology: A total of 121 consecutive inpatient nebulized bronchodilator prescriptions and treatments administered to 93 adult medical inpatients in a university hospital were studied prospectively. Five different aspects of the prescriptions were examined to assess their accuracy and completeness. The administration of each nebulizer treatment was studied using audit of medication charts and interview with ward nurses. Results: No prescription was correct and complete in all five aspects assessed. The most common mistake was failure to state the type and flow rate of driving gas (100%). This was followed by failure to prescribe recommended doses of bronchodilators (46%) and failure to give unambiguous instruction on frequency of treatment (39%). It was found that in only 21.5% of instances was the administration of nebulized bronchodilator drugs optimal. Conclusion: This prospective audit has demonstrated major deficiencies in the prescribing and administration of nebulized bronchodilators and it has highlighted the need for a local protocol and continuing staff education. The alternative method of administering bronchodilator via metered dose inhaler with large volume spacer should be evaluated in the treatment of acute airflow obstruction in hospitalized patients.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1843.2003.00442.x
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectBronchodilators
dc.subjectIpratropium bromide
dc.subjectNebulizers
dc.subjectSalbutamol
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentMEDICINE
dc.description.doi10.1046/j.1440-1843.2003.00442.x
dc.description.sourcetitleRespirology
dc.description.volume8
dc.description.issue2
dc.description.page205-207
dc.description.codenRSPIF
dc.identifier.isiut000183477900016
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