Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1163/15700658-12342358
Title: From self-defense to an instrument of war: Dutch privateering around the Malay Peninsula in the Early Seventeenth Century
Authors: Borschberg, P. 
Keywords: colonialism
Dutch East India Company (VOC)
Dutch Republic
Hugo Grotius
Malay Peninsula
Piracy
privateering
trade
warfare
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: Borschberg, P. (2013). From self-defense to an instrument of war: Dutch privateering around the Malay Peninsula in the Early Seventeenth Century. Journal of Early Modern History 17 (1) : 35-52. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1163/15700658-12342358
Abstract: This article examines the transition of the Dutch East Indian Company (VOC) from a policy of self-defense into its full espousal of large-scale privateering and plundering. I argue that this shift was driven by both economic and political factors, and can be traced to the very formation of the Company as a unified trading venture. The taking of prizes became a cornerstone not only of the economic fortunes of the company, but the establishment of the Dutch colonial empire in Asia. Of particular interest is not only the instructions emanating from the company directors and the Dutch government in the metropolis, but especially the implementation and adaptation of these directives on the ground. It is this local context that adds a crucial dimension to interpretations of the eager espousal of maritime violence by the VOC and its agents in Asian waters. © 2013 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden.
Source Title: Journal of Early Modern History
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/124422
ISSN: 13853783
DOI: 10.1163/15700658-12342358
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