Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.063
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dc.titleMemory T Cell Responses Targeting the SARS Coronavirus Persist up to 11 Years Post-Infection
dc.contributor.authorNg, Oi Wing
dc.contributor.authorChia, Adeline
dc.contributor.authorTan, Anthony T
dc.contributor.authorJadi, Ramesh S.
dc.contributor.authorLeong, Hoe Nam
dc.contributor.authorBertoletti, Antonio
dc.contributor.authorTan, Yee Joo
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T08:04:22Z
dc.date.available2016-05-04T08:04:22Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-12
dc.identifier.citationNg, Oi Wing, Chia, Adeline, Tan, Anthony T, Jadi, Ramesh S., Leong, Hoe Nam, Bertoletti, Antonio, Tan, Yee Joo (2016-04-12). Memory T Cell Responses Targeting the SARS Coronavirus Persist up to 11 Years Post-Infection. Vaccine 34 (17) : 2008–2014. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.063
dc.identifier.issn0264410X
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/123749
dc.description.abstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious infectious disease which first emerged in late 2002, caused by a then novel human coronavirus, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The virus is believed to have originated from bats and transmitted to human through intermediate animals such as civet cats. The re-emergence of SARS-CoV remains a valid concern due to the continual persistence of zoonotic SARS-CoVs and SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs) in bat reservoirs. In this study, the screening for the presence of SARS-specific T cells in a cohort of three SARS-recovered individuals at 9 and 11 years post-infection was carried out, and all memory T cell responses detected target the SARS-CoV structural proteins. Two CD8(+) T cell responses targeting the SARS-CoV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were characterized by determining their HLA restriction and minimal T cell epitope regions. Furthermore, these responses were found to persist up to 11 years post-infection. An absence of cross-reactivity of these CD8(+) T cell responses against the newly-emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was also demonstrated. The knowledge of the persistence of SARS-specific celullar immunity targeting the viral structural proteins in SARS-recovered individuals is important in the design and development of SARS vaccines, which are currently unavailable.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.063
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd
dc.subjectEpitope
dc.subjectImmunity
dc.subjectSARS-CoV
dc.subjectT cell
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentMICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS GRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL S'PORE
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.063
dc.description.sourcetitleVaccine
dc.description.volume34
dc.description.issue17
dc.description.page2008–2014
dc.identifier.isiut000374083400006
dc.published.statePublished
dc.grant.id10/1/21/19/652
dc.grant.fundingagencyA*STAR BMRC
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