Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/118735
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dc.titleEFFECTS OF FLUID SHEAR STRESS ON MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL CONTRACTILITY AND FATE
dc.contributor.authorSURABHI SONAM
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-12T18:00:29Z
dc.date.available2015-02-12T18:00:29Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-01
dc.identifier.citationSURABHI SONAM (2014-08-01). EFFECTS OF FLUID SHEAR STRESS ON MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL CONTRACTILITY AND FATE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/118735
dc.description.abstractFluid shear stress (FSS) impinges on intracellular contractility and also directs stem cell fate.However, the relationship between contractility and FSS mediated differentiation remains unclear. Here, we hypothesize that applied FSS can induce changes in the contractility and shape of a stem cell, and hence regulate its lineage determination. To understand the modular mechanism, we, first, identified FSS induced morphological and molecular changes occurring in hMSCs, leading to altered contractility and lineage determination. Increased cellular contractility allowed FSS mediated osteogenesis in hMSCs. Several drug tests and biophysical techniques were employed to influence the contractility of hMSCs while facing FSS.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectFluid Shear Stress, Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell, Differentiation, Cell Contractility, Microfluidics, Micro-topographies
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.departmentMECHANOBIOLOGY INSTITUTE
dc.contributor.supervisorLIM CHWEE TECK
dc.contributor.supervisorSHEETZ, MICHAEL
dc.description.degreePh.D
dc.description.degreeconferredPH.D. IN MECHANOBIOLOGY (FOS)
dc.identifier.isiutNOT_IN_WOS
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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