Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1089/scd.2012.0222
DC FieldValue
dc.titleMolecular basis of immortalization of human mesenchymal stem cells by combination of p53 knockdown and human telomerase reverse transcriptase overexpression
dc.contributor.authorLiu, T.M.
dc.contributor.authorNg, W.M.
dc.contributor.authorTan, H.S.
dc.contributor.authorVinitha, D.
dc.contributor.authorYang, Z.
dc.contributor.authorFan, J.B.
dc.contributor.authorZou, Y.
dc.contributor.authorHui, J.H.
dc.contributor.authorLee, E.H.
dc.contributor.authorLim, B.
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-12T07:50:08Z
dc.date.available2014-12-12T07:50:08Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-15
dc.identifier.citationLiu, T.M., Ng, W.M., Tan, H.S., Vinitha, D., Yang, Z., Fan, J.B., Zou, Y., Hui, J.H., Lee, E.H., Lim, B. (2013-01-15). Molecular basis of immortalization of human mesenchymal stem cells by combination of p53 knockdown and human telomerase reverse transcriptase overexpression. Stem Cells and Development 22 (2) : 268-278. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1089/scd.2012.0222
dc.identifier.issn15473287
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/116460
dc.description.abstractMesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent one of the most promising stem cells for a number of degenerative conditions due to their multipotency, immunoprivileged properties, and easy expansion in vitro. However, the limited life span of primary MSCs during in vitro expansion greatly hampers their use in clinical applications and basic research. Immortalization of MSCs will overcome this problem and may provide a very useful tool with which to study MSC biology. Here we showed that silencing p53 expression with lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA delayed the senescence by extended passage number, but was not sufficient to immortalize primary MSCs. However, combination of p53 knockdown and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) overexpression was sufficient to immortalize MSCs. The effects of p53 knockdown and hTERT overexpression on MSCs, including proliferation, colony formation, and differentiation, were determined. The resultant immortal MSCs displayed similar surface antigen profile to primary MSCs and retained MSC differentiation potential. Gene expression profile showed high similarity between immortalized MSCs and primary MSCs. In addition, immortalization-associated genes were also identified. Our data suggested immortalization of MSCs related to upregulation of cell cycle regulator and DNA repair genes enabling them to bypass cell crisis and complete mitosis. This study provides a new cellular model for basic studies of MSCs and understanding of the molecular basis of MSC immortalization. © 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/scd.2012.0222
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
dc.contributor.departmentLIFE SCIENCES INSTITUTE
dc.description.doi10.1089/scd.2012.0222
dc.description.sourcetitleStem Cells and Development
dc.description.volume22
dc.description.issue2
dc.description.page268-278
dc.description.codenSCDTA
dc.identifier.isiut000313577400009
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

32
checked on Oct 24, 2020

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

29
checked on Oct 16, 2020

Page view(s)

94
checked on Oct 23, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.