Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/116117
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dc.titleSide force suppression by dimples on ogive-cylinder body at high angles of attack
dc.contributor.authorCui, Y.D.
dc.contributor.authorTsai, H.M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-12T07:36:33Z
dc.date.available2014-12-12T07:36:33Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationCui, Y.D.,Tsai, H.M. (2008). Side force suppression by dimples on ogive-cylinder body at high angles of attack. 46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.isbn9781563479373
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/116117
dc.description.abstractThe effects of dimpled surface on the side forces and the separated vortex flow over an ogive-cylinder body at high angles of attack are experimentally investigated. Force measurements in a low speed wind tunnel show that the side forces can be suppressed even at 40° angle of attack without experiencing the distinctive bi-stable mode typical of smooth ogive-cylinder bodies. The pressure distributions show a more leeward turbulent flow separation. Low speed flow visualizations in a water tunnel show that the intermittently turbulent vortex structures from the different dimples influence the separation line and hence the main vortices. This results in the formation of a weaker unsteady symmetric vortex pair which greatly reduces the side forces at high angles of attack. This use of dimples for side forces suppression is robust with respect to variations in roll angles. Copyright © 2008 by the authors.
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeConference Paper
dc.contributor.departmentTEMASEK LABORATORIES
dc.description.sourcetitle46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit
dc.description.page-
dc.identifier.isiutNOT_IN_WOS
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