Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/112188
Title: Functional importance of RNA interactions in selection of translation initiation codons
Authors: Sprengart, M.L. 
Porter, A.G. 
Issue Date: 1997
Citation: Sprengart, M.L.,Porter, A.G. (1997). Functional importance of RNA interactions in selection of translation initiation codons. Molecular Microbiology 24 (1) : 19-28. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: RNA base pairing between the initiation codon and anticodon loop of initiator tRNA is essential but not sufficient for the selection of the 'correct' mRNA translational start site by ribosomes. In prokaryotes, additional RNA interactions between small ribosomal subunit RNA and mRNA sequences just upstream of the start codon can efficiently direct the ribosome to the initiation site. Although there is presently no proof for a similar important ribosomal RNA interaction in eukaryotes, the 5' non-coding regions of their mRNAs and 'consensus sequences' surrounding initiation codons have been shown to be strong determinants for initiation-site selection, but the exact mechanisms are not yet understood. Intramolecular base pairing in mRNA and participation of translation initiation factors can strongly influence the formation of mRNA-small ribosomal subunit-initiator tRNA complexes and modulate translational activities in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Only recently has it been appreciated that alternative mechanisms may also contribute to the selection of initiation codons in all organisms. Although direct proof is currently lacking, there is accumulating evidence that additional cis-acting mRNA elements and trans-acting proteins may form specific 'bridging' interactions with ribosomes during translation initiation.
Source Title: Molecular Microbiology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/112188
ISSN: 0950382X
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

Page view(s)

62
checked on Aug 16, 2019

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.