Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002201
DC FieldValue
dc.titleA role for phosphatidic acid in the formation of "supersized" Lipid droplets
dc.contributor.authorFei, W.
dc.contributor.authorShui, G.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Y.
dc.contributor.authorKrahmer, N.
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, C.
dc.contributor.authorKapterian, T.S.
dc.contributor.authorLin, R.C.
dc.contributor.authorDawes, I.W.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, A.J.
dc.contributor.authorLi, P.
dc.contributor.authorHuang, X.
dc.contributor.authorParton, R.G.
dc.contributor.authorWenk, M.R.
dc.contributor.authorWalther, T.C.
dc.contributor.authorYang, H.
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-27T02:44:33Z
dc.date.available2014-11-27T02:44:33Z
dc.date.issued2011-07
dc.identifier.citationFei, W., Shui, G., Zhang, Y., Krahmer, N., Ferguson, C., Kapterian, T.S., Lin, R.C., Dawes, I.W., Brown, A.J., Li, P., Huang, X., Parton, R.G., Wenk, M.R., Walther, T.C., Yang, H. (2011-07). A role for phosphatidic acid in the formation of "supersized" Lipid droplets. PLoS Genetics 7 (7) : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002201
dc.identifier.issn15537390
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/110995
dc.description.abstractLipid droplets (LDs) are important cellular organelles that govern the storage and turnover of lipids. Little is known about how the size of LDs is controlled, although LDs of diverse sizes have been observed in different tissues and under different (patho)physiological conditions. Recent studies have indicated that the size of LDs may influence adipogenesis, the rate of lipolysis and the oxidation of fatty acids. Here, a genome-wide screen identifies ten yeast mutants producing "supersized" LDs that are up to 50 times the volume of those in wild-type cells. The mutated genes include: FLD1, which encodes a homologue of mammalian seipin; five genes (CDS1, INO2, INO4, CHO2, and OPI3) that are known to regulate phospholipid metabolism; two genes (CKB1 and CKB2) encoding subunits of the casein kinase 2; and two genes (MRPS35 and RTC2) of unknown function. Biochemical and genetic analyses reveal that a common feature of these mutants is an increase in the level of cellular phosphatidic acid (PA). Results from in vivo and in vitro analyses indicate that PA may facilitate the coalescence of contacting LDs, resulting in the formation of "supersized" LDs. In summary, our results provide important insights into how the size of LDs is determined and identify novel gene products that regulate phospholipid metabolism. © 2011 Fei et al.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002201
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentLIFE SCIENCES INSTITUTE
dc.description.doi10.1371/journal.pgen.1002201
dc.description.sourcetitlePLoS Genetics
dc.description.volume7
dc.description.issue7
dc.description.page-
dc.identifier.isiut000293338600046
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
2011-role_phosphatidic_acid_formation_supersized-pub.pdf1.55 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

PublishedView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

202
checked on Jul 27, 2021

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

204
checked on Jul 19, 2021

Page view(s)

307
checked on Jul 12, 2021

Download(s)

5
checked on Jul 12, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.