Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-10-442
Title: Knowledge, attitudes and practices towards pandemic influenza among cases, close contacts, and healthcare workers in tropical Singapore: A cross-sectional survey
Authors: Yap, J.
Lee, V.J. 
Yau, T.Y.
Ng, T.P.
Tor, P.-C.
Issue Date: 2010
Citation: Yap, J., Lee, V.J., Yau, T.Y., Ng, T.P., Tor, P.-C. (2010). Knowledge, attitudes and practices towards pandemic influenza among cases, close contacts, and healthcare workers in tropical Singapore: A cross-sectional survey. BMC Public Health 10 : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-10-442
Abstract: Background. Effective influenza pandemic management requires understanding of the factors influencing behavioral changes. We aim to determine the differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices in various different cohorts and explore the pertinent factors that influenced behavior in tropical Singapore. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional knowledge, attitudes and practices survey in the Singapore military from mid-August to early-October 2009, among 3054 personnel in four exposure groups - laboratory-confirmed H1N1-2009 cases, close contacts of cases, healthcare workers, and general personnel. Results. 1063 (34.8%) participants responded. The mean age was 21.4 (SE 0.2) years old. Close contacts had the highest knowledge score (71.7%, p = 0.004) while cases had the highest practice scores (58.8%, p < 0.001). There was a strong correlation between knowledge and practice scores (r = 0.27, p < 0.01) and knowledge and attitudes scores (r = 0.21, p < 0.01). The significant predictors of higher practice scores were higher knowledge scores (p < 0.001), Malay ethnicity (p < 0.001), exposure group (p < 0.05) and lower education level (p < 0.05). The significant predictors for higher attitudes scores were Malay ethnicity (p = 0.014) and higher knowledge scores (p < 0.001). The significant predictor for higher knowledge score was being a contact (p = 0.007). Conclusion. Knowledge is a significant influence on attitudes and practices in a pandemic, and personal experience influences practice behaviors. Efforts should be targeted at educating the general population to improve practices in the current pandemic, as well as for future epidemics. © 2010 Yap et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Source Title: BMC Public Health
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/109430
ISSN: 14712458
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-442
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