Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgr175
Title: Glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene polymorphisms, cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk among Chinese in Singapore
Authors: Koh, W.-P. 
Nelson, H.H.
Yuan, J.-M.
van den Berg, D.
Jin, A.
Wang, R.
Yu, M.C.
Issue Date: Oct-2011
Citation: Koh, W.-P., Nelson, H.H., Yuan, J.-M., van den Berg, D., Jin, A., Wang, R., Yu, M.C. (2011-10). Glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene polymorphisms, cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk among Chinese in Singapore. Carcinogenesis 32 (10) : 1507-1511. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgr175
Abstract: Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Putative colorectal procarcinogens in tobacco smoke include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines that are known substrates of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). This study examined the influence of functional GST gene polymorphisms on the smoking-colorectal cancer association in a population known to be minimally exposed to dietary sources of these procarcinogens. Incident cases of colorectal cancer (n = 480) and matched controls (n = 1167) were selected from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort of 63 257 men and women who have been followed since 1993. We determined the deletion polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and the functional polymorphism at codon 105 of GSTP1 for each subject. A three level composite GST index was used to examine if GST profile affected a smoker's risk of developing colorectal cancer. While there was no statistically significant association between cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk among subjects absent of any at-risk GST genotypes, smokers possessing two to three at-risk GST genotypes exhibited a statistically significant increased risk of colorectal cancer compared with nonsmokers (P = 0.0002). In this latter stratum, heavy smokers exhibited a >5-fold increased risk relative to never-smokers (odds ratio, 5.43; 95% confidence interval, 2.22-13.23). Subjects with one at-risk GST genotype displayed a statistically significant but weaker association with smoking. These findings suggest that GST gene polymorphisms influence interindividual susceptibility to smoking-associated colorectal cancer. Our data indicate an important role for GST enzymes in the detoxification of colorectal carcinogens in tobacco smoke. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Carcinogenesis
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/109369
ISSN: 01433334
DOI: 10.1093/carcin/bgr175
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