Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.12-10980
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dc.titleMetabolic syndrome and risk of age-related cataract over time: An analysis of interval-censored data using a random-effects model
dc.contributor.authorMaralani, H.G.
dc.contributor.authorTai, B.C.
dc.contributor.authorWong, T.Y.
dc.contributor.authorTai, E.S.
dc.contributor.authorLi, J.
dc.contributor.authorWang, J.J.
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, P.
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-26T05:04:05Z
dc.date.available2014-11-26T05:04:05Z
dc.date.issued2013-01
dc.identifier.citationMaralani, H.G., Tai, B.C., Wong, T.Y., Tai, E.S., Li, J., Wang, J.J., Mitchell, P. (2013-01). Metabolic syndrome and risk of age-related cataract over time: An analysis of interval-censored data using a random-effects model. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science 54 (1) : 641-646. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.12-10980
dc.identifier.issn01460404
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/108987
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE. To investigate whether the effect of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components on the incidence of different cataract subtypes (cortical, nuclear, and posterior subcapsular cataract [PSC]) change with time. METHODS. A prospective cohort of persons 49 years of age and older were followed over 10 years in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, west of Sydney, Australia. MetS components as defined by the International Diabetes Federation criteria were measured at baseline (1992-1994), after 5 years (1997-1999), and after 10 years (2002-2004). The incidence of different cataract subtypes was obtained from standard photographic grading at these intervals (n = 1997). Using a random-effects complementary log-log regression model with time to cataract development in discrete time interval, we estimated the effect of MetS and its components on the incidence of different cataract subtypes at different time intervals. RESULTS. After accounting for changes in MetS components over time and controlling for possible confounders, MetS was found to be associated with an increased 5-year incidence of cortical cataract (hazard ratio [HR] 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-2.09) and PSC cataract (HR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.01-3.04). Among the five MetS components, high glucose and obesity predicted an increased 5-year incidence of cortical cataract. In addition, low high-density lipoprotein and high glucose were associated with an increased 10-year incidence of cortical and PSC cataracts, respectively. CONCLUSIONS. Changes in MetS predicted the 5-year incidence of cortical and PSC cataracts. Different MetS components predicted the incidence of cortical and PSC cataracts at varying time intervals. © 2013 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/iovs.12-10980
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentSTATISTICS & APPLIED PROBABILITY
dc.contributor.departmentSAW SWEE HOCK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.contributor.departmentOPHTHALMOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1167/iovs.12-10980
dc.description.sourcetitleInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
dc.description.volume54
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page641-646
dc.description.codenIOVSD
dc.identifier.isiut000314338400082
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