Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.3516
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dc.titleImpact of cancer-related fatigue on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Asian cancer patients
dc.contributor.authorPoon, K.S.H.
dc.contributor.authorUn, M.K.
dc.contributor.authorLow, X.H.
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Y.T.
dc.contributor.authorYap, K.Y.-L.
dc.contributor.authorChan, A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-29T01:53:55Z
dc.date.available2014-10-29T01:53:55Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.citationPoon, K.S.H., Un, M.K., Low, X.H., Cheung, Y.T., Yap, K.Y.-L., Chan, A. (2013-12). Impact of cancer-related fatigue on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Asian cancer patients. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety 22 (12) : 1345-1351. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.3516
dc.identifier.issn10538569
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/106022
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has been suggested to be associated with the occurrence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). This study aims to evaluate the potential of CRF in predicting the occurrence of CINV. Method: This is a prospective, observational study. Recruited patients received moderately to highly emetogenic single-day chemotherapy regimens. On the day of chemotherapy, patients were instructed to provide a score (Likert scale of 0-10) to describe how CRF interfered with his or her ability to engage in daily activities and a score for how severe it was. Patients were then given a standardized 5-day diary to document their CINV events. Results: A total of 473 eligible patients (median age: 55years, interquartile range (IQR): 48-61years) were recruited, with most of the patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal (45%) and breast (37%) cancers. The median score of fatigue interference was 3 (IQR: 0-5). After confounders were adjusted for, patients with low fatigue interference scores (≤3) were more likely to achieve complete protection (no nausea, no vomiting, and no breakthrough antiemetics) of CINV (adjusted odds ratio=1.57, 95%CI [1.05, 2.35], p=0.027). Conclusion: This is the largest study to date to evaluate the association between CRF and CINV. Patients experiencing CRF possessed a higher risk of poor control for CINV. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pds.3516
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectAnticancer treatment
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectCancer
dc.subjectChemotherapy
dc.subjectFatigue
dc.subjectNausea and vomiting
dc.subjectPharmacoepidemiology
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentPHARMACY
dc.description.doi10.1002/pds.3516
dc.description.sourcetitlePharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety
dc.description.volume22
dc.description.issue12
dc.description.page1345-1351
dc.description.codenPDSAE
dc.identifier.isiut000327446700013
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