Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1586/14789450.4.6.769
Title: Ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction in Parkinson's disease: Current evidence and controversies
Authors: Lim, K.-L. 
Keywords: Autophagy
Parkin
Parkinson's disease
Parkinsonism
Proteasome
Synuclein
Ubiquitin
UCHL1
Issue Date: Dec-2007
Citation: Lim, K.-L. (2007-12). Ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction in Parkinson's disease: Current evidence and controversies. Expert Review of Proteomics 4 (6) : 769-781. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1586/14789450.4.6.769
Abstract: Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Although a subject of intense research, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Over the last decade, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has emerged as a compelling player in PD pathogenesis. Disruption of the UPS, which normally identifies and degrades intracellular proteins, is thought to promote the toxic accumulation of proteins detrimental to neuronal survival, thereby contributing to their demise. Support for this came from a broad range of studies, including genetics, gene profiling and post-mortem analysis, as well as in vitro and in vivo modeling. Notably, various cellular and animal models of PD based on direct disruption of UPS function reproduce the salient features of PD. However, several gaps remain in our current knowledge regarding the precise role of UPS dysfunction in the pathogenesis of the disease. Current thoughts regarding their relationship are reviewed here and some major unresolved questions, the clarification of which would considerably advance our understanding of the implicated role of the UPS in PD pathogenesis, are discussed. © 2007 Future Drugs Ltd.
Source Title: Expert Review of Proteomics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/102583
ISSN: 14789450
DOI: 10.1586/14789450.4.6.769
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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