Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2009.01434.x
Title: Effects of land-use change on community composition of tropical amphibians and reptiles in Sulawesi, Indonesia
Authors: Wanger, T.C.
Iskandar, D.T.
Motzke, I.
Brook, B.W.
Sodhi, N.S. 
Clough, Y.
Tscharntke, T.
Keywords: Amphibians
Bayesian modeling
Cacao agroforestry
Indonesia
Land-use change
Reptiles
Southeast Asia
Issue Date: Jun-2010
Citation: Wanger, T.C., Iskandar, D.T., Motzke, I., Brook, B.W., Sodhi, N.S., Clough, Y., Tscharntke, T. (2010-06). Effects of land-use change on community composition of tropical amphibians and reptiles in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Conservation Biology 24 (3) : 795-802. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2009.01434.x
Abstract: Little is known about the effects of anthropogenic land-use change on the amphibians and reptiles of the biodiverse tropical forests of Southeast Asia. We studied a land-use modification gradient stretching from primary forest, secondary forest, natural-shade cacao agroforest, planted-shade cacao agroforest to open areas in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. We determined species richness, abundance, turnover, and community composition in all habitat types and related these to environmental correlates, such as canopy heterogeneity and thickness of leaf litter. Amphibian species richness decreased systematically along the land-use modification gradient, but reptile richness and abundance peaked in natural-shade cacao agroforests. Species richness and abundance patterns across the disturbance gradient were best explained by canopy cover and leaf-litter thickness in amphibians and by canopy heterogeneity and cover in reptiles. Amphibians were more severely affected by forest disturbance in Sulawesi than reptiles. Heterogeneous canopy cover and thick leaf litter should be maintained in cacao plantations to facilitate the conservation value for both groups. For long-term and sustainable use of plantations, pruned shade trees should be permanently kept to allow rejuvenation of cacao and, thus, to prevent repeated forest encroachment. © 2010 Society for Conservation Biology.
Source Title: Conservation Biology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/100549
ISSN: 08888892
DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2009.01434.x
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

59
checked on Apr 16, 2021

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

52
checked on Apr 8, 2021

Page view(s)

85
checked on Apr 11, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.