Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1200457109
Title: Direct observation of stick-slip movements of water nanodroplets induced by an electron beam
Authors: Mirsaidov, U.M.
Zheng, H.
Bhattacharya, D.
Casana, Y.
Matsudaira, P. 
Keywords: Interfacial water
Nanoscale fluids
Issue Date: 8-May-2012
Citation: Mirsaidov, U.M., Zheng, H., Bhattacharya, D., Casana, Y., Matsudaira, P. (2012-05-08). Direct observation of stick-slip movements of water nanodroplets induced by an electron beam. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 109 (19) : 7187-7190. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1200457109
Abstract: Dynamics of the first few nanometers of water at the interface are encountered in a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. A simple but critical question is whether interfacial forces at these nanoscale dimensions affect an externally induced movement of a water droplet on a surface. At the bulk-scale water droplets spread on a hydrophilic surface and slip on a nonwetting, hydrophobic surface. Here we report the experimental description of the electron beam-induced dynamics of nanoscale water droplets by direct imaging the translocation of 10- to 80-nm-diameter water nanodroplets by transmission electron microscopy. These nanodroplets move on a hydrophilic surface not by a smooth flow but by a series of stick-slip steps. We observe that each step is preceded by a unique characteristic deformation of the nanodroplet into a toroidal shape induced by the electron beam. We propose that this beam-induced change in shape increases the surface free energy of the nanodroplet that drives its transition from stick to slip state.
Source Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/100473
ISSN: 00278424
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1200457109
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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