Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/98939
Title: Three-dimensional microstructures in silicon via the combination of light-ion beam writing and electrochemical etching
Authors: Blackwood, D.J. 
Teo, E.J. 
Breese, M.B.H. 
Bettiol, A.A. 
Issue Date: 2004
Source: Blackwood, D.J.,Teo, E.J.,Breese, M.B.H.,Bettiol, A.A. (2004). Three-dimensional microstructures in silicon via the combination of light-ion beam writing and electrochemical etching. Proceedings - Electrochemical Society 9 : 108-116. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Many state-of-the-art technologies, such as micro-/nano-electromechanical systems, optoelectronics and photonics, require the fabrication of precise three-dimensional structures in semiconductor materials. A major limitation of conventional lithography and silicon etching technologies is that multiple processing steps are required to fabricate free-standing multilevel structures. However, it is known that the mechanism by which a silicon wafer can be electrochemically etched in solutions of hydrofluoric acid depends on its conductivity. This has enabled the development of an alternative mask-less patterning process that combines proton irradiation with electrochemical etching. A high-energy beam of light-ions focused to a small spot by a nuclear microprobe, selectively damages the semiconductor lattice in the irradiated regions. This damage acts as an electrical barrier during subsequent electrochemical etching, so the un-irradiated regions are preferentially removed, leaving a copy of the patterned microstructure. Furthermore the ability to control the depth of damage/implantation introduces the possibility of producing three-dimensional structures.
Source Title: Proceedings - Electrochemical Society
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/98939
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