Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1021/jp0657282
Title: Kinetics and equilibrium distribution of colloidal assembly under an alternating electric field and correlation to degree of perfection of colloidal crystals
Authors: Liu, Y.
Liu, X.-Y. 
Narayanan, J. 
Issue Date: 18-Jan-2007
Citation: Liu, Y., Liu, X.-Y., Narayanan, J. (2007-01-18). Kinetics and equilibrium distribution of colloidal assembly under an alternating electric field and correlation to degree of perfection of colloidal crystals. Journal of Physical Chemistry C 111 (2) : 995-998. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1021/jp0657282
Abstract: The kinetics and equilibrium distribution of colloidal particles near an electrode surface subjected to an alternating electric field are investigated by varying the frequency, field strength, and salt concentration. The variation of the aggregation rate constant as well as the order/crystallinity of the lattice can be correlated to the variation of the equilibrium interparticle separation req within the frequency window for the two-dimensional (2D) assembly. Particle size, ionic concentration, and field strength also affect the mean equilibrium distance between neighboring particles, thus establishing that req can be used as a new criterion to examine the degree of perfection of a 2D colloidal assembly and the self-assembly process of colloidal particles. The understanding gained in this study may be found useful in the design of self-assembled templates using colloidal particles. © 2007 American Chemical Society.
Source Title: Journal of Physical Chemistry C
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/97024
ISSN: 19327447
DOI: 10.1021/jp0657282
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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