Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1039/b416493h
Title: Supramolecular associations in binary antimony(III) dithiocarbamates: Influence of ligand steric bulk, influence on coordination geometry, and competition with hydrogenbonding
Authors: Liu, Y.
Tiekink, E.R.T. 
Issue Date: 4-Jan-2005
Citation: Liu, Y., Tiekink, E.R.T. (2005-01-04). Supramolecular associations in binary antimony(III) dithiocarbamates: Influence of ligand steric bulk, influence on coordination geometry, and competition with hydrogenbonding. CrystEngComm 7 : 20-27. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1039/b416493h
Abstract: New structural data for molecules of the general formula Sb(S 2CNR2)3, with both non-sterically and sterically demanding R groups, complement literature data and allow an assessment of factors dictating supramolecular association. With relatively small R substituents, dimer formation via Sb⋯S secondary interactions is observed. With bulky R groups, Sb⋯S interactions are not possible owing to steric hindrance and C-H⋯S hydrogen-bonding predominates instead, again leading to dimers. In cases where R carries hydrogen-bonding functionality, both Sb⋯S and O-H⋯O co-exist when R is small but Sb⋯S secondary bonding is switched off when R becomes larger. The conclusion of the study is that remote R substituents in molecules of this type are able to dictate modes of supramolecular association, i.e. Sb⋯S versus C-H⋯S, and that the resultant formation of loosely associated dimers facilitates efficient crystal packing. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2005.
Source Title: CrystEngComm
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/94975
ISSN: 14668033
DOI: 10.1039/b416493h
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