Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/94219
Title: Methanol adsorption and decomposition on rhodium
Authors: Chuah, G.-K. 
Kruse, N.
Schmidt, W.A.
Block, J.H.
Abend, G.
Issue Date: Oct-1989
Source: Chuah, G.-K.,Kruse, N.,Schmidt, W.A.,Block, J.H.,Abend, G. (1989-10). Methanol adsorption and decomposition on rhodium. Journal of Catalysis 119 (2) : 342-353. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The decomposition of methanol on rhodium probed from ~200 atomic sites of the (001) or (111) planes of Rh field emitter crystals but randomly with regard to crystallographic zones was studied by pulsed field desorption mass spectrometry. High electric field pulses were used to quantitatively desorb the final products, carbon monoxide and hydrogen, thus achieving steady-state conditions. Substantial amounts of methoxy (mainly desorbed as CH3 + ions) were also present at the surface. Applying a steady electric field, Fr $ ̌= 4 V/nm, between the field pulses, led to a deceleration of the decomposition reaction and to an increase of the amount of adsorbed CH3O and CH2O species. There were indications that the rate-determining step of the reaction is CH bond cleavage in adsorbed methoxy to form the CH2O intermediate. This was supported by the observation of a kinetic isotope effect in the formation of CD2O and CHDO from methy-d2-alcohol, CHD2OH. Here, the CH bond breaking to form the CD2O was found to be twice as fast as the breaking of the CD bond which results in CHDO. Field ion microscopy was applied to investigate the influence of the reaction on the structure of the whole hemispherical single crystal surface. There were neither topographic changes nor corrosion of the Rh surface after field-free exposure to 2 Pa methanol at temperatures Up to 423 K. © 1989.
Source Title: Journal of Catalysis
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/94219
ISSN: 00219517
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

Page view(s)

48
checked on Feb 16, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.