Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/92084
Title: Lead removal from synthetic wastewater by crystallization in a fluidized-bed reactor
Authors: Chen, J.P. 
Yu, H. 
Keywords: Crystallization
Fluidized-bed reactor
Lead
Precipitation
Recovery
Removal
Issue Date: 2000
Source: Chen, J.P.,Yu, H. (2000). Lead removal from synthetic wastewater by crystallization in a fluidized-bed reactor. Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering 35 (6) : 817-835. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: A fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) was employed in the study to remove lead from the synthetic wastewater by crystallization of metal carbonate precipitates on surfaces of the sand grains. For the influent concentration up to 40 mg/L, lead removal efficiency reached 99 % and the effluent concentration was less than 1 mg/L when the system was operated with a series of optimum conditions. Feed ratio C(τ)/[Pb2+] and recycle ratio should be maintained at 3 mol/mol and 0.67, respectively, and the hydraulic load should not be more than 22 m/h. The optimum pH for lead carbonate crystallization was 8 to 9, while the ratio of bed height to total height of the FBR was 0.25 to 0.3. In addition, the stable operation in terms of lead removal and solution turbidity was observed after a 380-minute operation. Analysis of the composition of crystals deposited on the sand grains surface showed that nearly 99% was lead salt. Furthermore the lead ions can be easily recovered by adding hydrochloride acid. This lead solution could be suitable for further industrial purposes.
Source Title: Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/92084
ISSN: 10934529
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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