Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1088/0957-4484/25/10/105102
Title: Sucrose ester stabilized solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers: II. Evaluation of the imidazole antifungal drug-loaded nanoparticle dispersions and their gel formulations
Authors: Das, S.
Ng, W.K. 
Tan, R.B.H. 
Keywords: antifungal drug
nanostructured lipid carrier
rheology
solid lipid nanoparticle
sucrose ester
topical gel
Issue Date: 14-Mar-2014
Citation: Das, S., Ng, W.K., Tan, R.B.H. (2014-03-14). Sucrose ester stabilized solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers: II. Evaluation of the imidazole antifungal drug-loaded nanoparticle dispersions and their gel formulations. Nanotechnology 25 (10) : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1088/0957-4484/25/10/105102
Abstract: This study focused on: (i) feasibility of the previously developed sucrose ester stabilized SLNs and NLCs to encapsulate different imidazole antifungal drugs and (ii) preparation and evaluation of topical gel formulations of those SLNs and NLCs. Three imidazole antifungal drugs; clotrimazole, ketoconazole and climbazole were selected for this study. The results suggested that size, size distribution and drug encapsulation efficiency depend on the drug molecule and type of nanoparticles (SLN/NLC). The drug release experiment always showed faster drug release from NLCs than SLNs when the same drug molecule was loaded in both nanoparticles. However, drug release rate from both SLNs and NLCs followed the order of climbazole > ketoconazole > clotrimazole. NLCs demonstrated better physicochemical stability than SLNs in the case of all drugs. The drug release rate from ketoconazole- and clotrimazole-loaded SLNs became faster after three months than a fresh formulation. There was no significant change in drug release rate from climbazole-loaded SLNs and all drug-loaded NLCs. Gel formulations of SLNs and NLCs were prepared using polycarbophil polymer. Continuous flow measurements demonstrated non-Newtonian flow with shear-thinning behavior and thixotropy. Oscillation measurements depicted viscoelasticity of the gel formulations. Similar to nanoparticle dispersion, drug release rate from SLN- and NLC-gel was in the order of climbazole > ketoconazole > clotrimazole. However, significantly slower drug release was noticed from all gel formulations than their nanoparticle counterparts. Unlike nanoparticle dispersions, no significant difference in drug release from gel formulations containing SLNs and NLCs was observed for each drug. This study concludes that gel formulation of imidazole drug-loaded SLNs and NLCs can be used for sustained/prolonged topical delivery of the drugs. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.
Source Title: Nanotechnology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/90226
ISSN: 09574484
DOI: 10.1088/0957-4484/25/10/105102
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