Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.02.048
Title: Effect of increasing anodic NaCl concentration on microbial fuel cell performance
Authors: Lefebvre, O. 
Tan, Z. 
Kharkwal, S. 
Ng, H.Y. 
Keywords: Acidogenesis
Anaerobic digestion
Electrogenesis
Methanogenesis
TDS
Issue Date: May-2012
Source: Lefebvre, O., Tan, Z., Kharkwal, S., Ng, H.Y. (2012-05). Effect of increasing anodic NaCl concentration on microbial fuel cell performance. Bioresource Technology 112 : 336-340. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.02.048
Abstract: High salinity effluents represent an estimated 5% of the wastewater generated worldwide. In microbial fuel cells, high salinity is usually considered beneficial to power production because increased conductivity facilitates proton transfer and therefore decreases the internal resistance of the system. However, high salt concentrations are known to adversely affect the physiology of anaerobic microbial consortia. In this study, the effect of increasing NaCl concentration in the anode chamber of a microbial fuel cell fed with sodium acetate was tested. Adding up to 20gL -1 of NaCl enhanced the overall performance of the system, reducing the internal resistance by 33% and increasing the maximum power production by 30%. Higher NaCl concentration proved detrimental to the system. However, the Coulombic efficiency started to be affected at a much lower NaCl concentration of 10gL -1, showing that the anodophilic bacteria are sensitive to NaCl at relatively low concentrations. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Source Title: Bioresource Technology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/88794
ISSN: 09608524
DOI: 10.1016/j.biortech.2012.02.048
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

52
checked on Feb 15, 2018

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

47
checked on Jan 31, 2018

Page view(s)

44
checked on Feb 19, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.