Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1021/es201559g
Title: Complete debromination of tetra- and penta-brominated diphenyl ethers by a coculture consisting of Dehalococcoides and Desulfovibrio species
Authors: Lee, L.K.
Ding, C.
Yang, K.-L. 
He, J. 
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2011
Citation: Lee, L.K., Ding, C., Yang, K.-L., He, J. (2011-10-01). Complete debromination of tetra- and penta-brominated diphenyl ethers by a coculture consisting of Dehalococcoides and Desulfovibrio species. Environmental Science and Technology 45 (19) : 8475-8482. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1021/es201559g
Abstract: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widespread global contaminants due to their extensive usage as flame retardants. Among the 209 PBDE congeners, tetra-brominated diphenyl ether (tetra-BDE) (congener 47) and penta-BDEs (congeners 99 and 100) are the most abundant, toxic, and bioaccumulative congeners in the environment. However, little is known about microorganisms that carry out debromination of these congeners under anaerobic conditions. In this study, we describe a coculture GY2 consisting of Dehalococcoides and Desulfovibrio spp., which is capable of debrominating ∼1180 nM of congeners 47, 99, and 100 (88-100% removal) to the nonbrominated diphenyl ether at an average rate of 36.9, 19.8, and 21.9 nM day -1, respectively. Ortho bromines are preferentially removed during the debromination process. The growth of Dehalococcoides links tightly with PBDE debromination, with an estimated growth yield of 1.99 × 10 14 cells per mole of bromide released, while the growth of Desulfovibrio could be independent of PBDEs. The growth-coupled debromination suggests that Dehalococcoides cells in the coculture GY2 are able to respire on PBDEs. Given the ubiquity and recalcitrance of the tetra- and penta-BDEs, complete debromination of these congeners to less toxic end products (e.g. diphenyl ether) is important for the restoration of PBDE-contaminated environments. © 2011 American Chemical Society.
Source Title: Environmental Science and Technology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/88677
ISSN: 0013936X
DOI: 10.1021/es201559g
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