Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2039456
Title: Simultaneous stimulated Raman scattering and higher harmonic generation imaging for liver disease diagnosis without labeling
Authors: Lin, J.
Wang, Z.
Zheng, W. 
Huang, Z. 
Keywords: collagen
fatty liver
hepatic fat
liver disease
liver fibrosis
multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy
second harmonic generation
stimulated Raman scattering
third harmonic generation
Issue Date: 2014
Source: Lin, J., Wang, Z., Zheng, W., Huang, Z. (2014). Simultaneous stimulated Raman scattering and higher harmonic generation imaging for liver disease diagnosis without labeling. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE 8948 : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2039456
Abstract: Nonlinear optical microscopy (e.g., higher harmonic (second-/third- harmonic) generation (HHG), simulated Raman scattering (SRS)) has high diagnostic sensitivity and chemical specificity, making it a promising tool for label-free tissue and cell imaging. In this work, we report a development of a simultaneous SRS and HHG imaging technique for characterization of liver disease in a bile-duct-ligation rat-modal. HHG visualizes collagens formation and reveals the cell morphologic changes associated with liver fibrosis; whereas SRS identifies the distributions of hepatic fat cells formed in steatosis liver tissue. This work shows that the co-registration of SRS and HHG images can be an effective means for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver steatosis/fibrosis at the cellular and molecular levels. © 2014 SPIE.
Source Title: Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/88353
ISBN: 9780819498618
ISSN: 16057422
DOI: 10.1117/12.2039456
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