Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/85932
Title: Dynamic tensile testing of ligaments from the human cervical spine
Authors: Shim, V.P.W. 
Liu, J.F. 
Lee, V.S.
Keywords: Cervical spine
Hopkinson bar
Ligament
Strain rate
Issue Date: 2005
Source: Shim, V.P.W.,Liu, J.F.,Lee, V.S. (2005). Dynamic tensile testing of ligaments from the human cervical spine. Proceedings of the 2005 SEM Annual Conference and Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics : 141-148. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This study focuses on establishing appropriate experimental methodology to facilitate investigation of the dynamic stress-strain characteristics of soft bio-tissues. Dynamic mechanical tests were conducted on ligaments from the human cervical spine (neck), using a tensile split Hopkinson bar device. The strain rates imposed were of the order of 102-103/s. As ligaments are extremely soft and extensible, specific test protocols relating to Hopkinson bar testing were developed to enable the acquisition of reliable and accurate data. These encompass aspects such as detection of transmitted waves of small magnitudes, a means to perform tests with absolutely zero preloading, and generation of a sufficiently long loading pulse. Comparison with static test results reveals that the initial physiologic (toe) region for dynamic loading is noticeably shorter, while the accompanying stress levels and strength are elevated and able to attain values more than two to three times the static values. However, the elongation capacity of ligaments under dynamic loading is reduced. Simple empirical equations were found to provide suitable fits to the response prior to attainment of the ultimate stress.
Source Title: Proceedings of the 2005 SEM Annual Conference and Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/85932
ISBN: 0912053909
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

Page view(s)

29
checked on Feb 23, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.