Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1021/la061504z
Title: Nonvolatile polymer memory device based on bistable electrical switching in a thin film of poly(N-vinylcarbazole) with covalently bonded C60
Authors: Ling, Q.-D. 
Lim, S.-L.
Song, Y.
Zhu, C.-X. 
Chan, D.S.-H. 
Kang, E.-T. 
Neoh, K.-G. 
Issue Date: 2-Jan-2007
Citation: Ling, Q.-D., Lim, S.-L., Song, Y., Zhu, C.-X., Chan, D.S.-H., Kang, E.-T., Neoh, K.-G. (2007-01-02). Nonvolatile polymer memory device based on bistable electrical switching in a thin film of poly(N-vinylcarbazole) with covalently bonded C60. Langmuir 23 (1) : 312-319. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1021/la061504z
Abstract: A functional polymer (PVK-C60), containing carbazole moieties and fullerene moieties in a molar ratio of about 100:1, was synthesized by covalent tethering of C60 to poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK). The molecular structure and composition of PVK-C60 were characterized by FTIR, Raman, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CyV). It was observed that the C60-modified PVK exhibited an enhanced glass-transition temperature and good solubility in organic solvents such as toluene, tetrahydrofuran, chloroform, and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The polymer memory exhibited an ON/OFF current ratio of more than 105 and write/erase voltages around -2.8 V/+3.0V. Both the ON and OFF states were stable under a constant voltage stress of -1 V for 12 h and survived up to 108 read cycles at -1 under ambient conditions.
Source Title: Langmuir
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/82778
ISSN: 07437463
DOI: 10.1021/la061504z
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