Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2013.11.007
Title: Delivery of basic fibroblast growth factors from heparinized decellularized adipose tissue stimulates potent de novo adipogenesis
Authors: Lu, Q.
Li, M.
Zou, Y.
Cao, T. 
Keywords: Adipose tissue engineering
ECM
Growth factors
Heparin
Issue Date: 28-Jan-2014
Source: Lu, Q., Li, M., Zou, Y., Cao, T. (2014-01-28). Delivery of basic fibroblast growth factors from heparinized decellularized adipose tissue stimulates potent de novo adipogenesis. Journal of Controlled Release 174 (1) : 43-50. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2013.11.007
Abstract: Scaffolds based on decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) are gaining popularity in adipose tissue engineering due to their high biocompatibility and adipogenic inductive property. However, previous studies involving DAT-derived scaffolds have not fully revealed their potentials for in vivo adipose tissue construction. With the aim of developing a more efficient adipose tissue engineering technique based on DAT, in this study, we investigated the in vivo adipogenic potential of a basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) delivery system based on heparinized DAT (Hep-DAT). To generate this system, heparins were cross-linked to mouse DATs by using 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide and N-Hydroxysuccinimide. The bFGF-binding Hep-DATs were first tested for controlled release ability in vitro and then transplanted subcutaneously. Highly vascularized adipose tissues were formed 6 weeks after transplantation. Histology and gene expression analysis revealed that majority of the Hep-DAT scaffolds were infiltrated with host-derived adipose tissues that possessed similar adipogenic and inflammatory gene expression as endogenous adipose tissues. Additionally, strong de novo adipogenesis could also be induced when bFGF-binding Hep-DATs were thoroughly minced and injected subcutaneously. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that bFGF-binding Hep-DAT could be an efficient, biocompatible and injectable adipogenic system for in vivo adipose tissue engineering. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Journal of Controlled Release
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/79880
ISSN: 01683659
DOI: 10.1016/j.jconrel.2013.11.007
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