Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1021/jf030723c
Title: The chemistry behind antioxidant capacity assays
Authors: Huang, D. 
Boxin, O.U.
Prior, R.L.
Keywords: Antioxidants
Assay
Electron-transfer reaction
Free radicals
Hydrogen atom transfer reaction
Oxidants
Issue Date: 23-Mar-2005
Source: Huang, D., Boxin, O.U., Prior, R.L. (2005-03-23). The chemistry behind antioxidant capacity assays. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 53 (6) : 1841-1856. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf030723c
Abstract: This review summarizes the multifaceted aspects of antioxidants and the basic kinetic models of inhibited autoxidation and analyzes the chemical principles of antioxidant capacity assays. Depending upon the reactions involved, these assays can roughly be classified into two types: assays based on hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions and assays based on electron transfer (ET). The majority of HAT-based assays apply a competitive reaction scheme, in which antioxidant and substrate compete for thermally generated peroxyl radicals through the decomposition of azo compounds. These assays include inhibition of induced low-density lipoprotein autoxidation, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), total radical trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP), and crocin bleaching assays. ET-based assays measure the capacity of an antioxidant in the reduction of an oxidant, which changes color when reduced. The degree of color change is correlated with the sample's antioxidant concentrations. ET-based assays include the total phenols assay by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (FCR), Trolox equivalence antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), "total antioxidant potential" assay using a Cu(II) complex as an oxidant, and DPPH. In addition, other assays intended to measure a sample's scavenging capacity of biologically relevant oxidants such as singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, peroxynitrite, and hydroxyl radical are also summarized. On the basis of this analysis, it is suggested that the total phenols assay by FCR be used to quantify an antioxidant's reducing capacity and the ORAC assay to quantify peroxyl radical scavenging capacity. To comprehensively study different aspects of antioxidants, validated and specific assays are needed in addition to these two commonly accepted assays. © 2005 American Chemical Society.
Source Title: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/77662
ISSN: 00218561
DOI: 10.1021/jf030723c
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