Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3672855
Title: The thickness, electric field, and strain effects on the magnetic anisotropy of FeCo/MgO(001) thin films: A first principles study
Authors: He, K.H.
Chen, J.S. 
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2012
Citation: He, K.H., Chen, J.S. (2012-04-01). The thickness, electric field, and strain effects on the magnetic anisotropy of FeCo/MgO(001) thin films: A first principles study. Journal of Applied Physics 111 (7) : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3672855
Abstract: The magnetic anisotropy of the FeCo/MgO(001) thin films with the effects of thickness, the electric field, and the strain of the in-plane lattice constant were investigated by first-principles calculations. The thickness dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of FeCo ultrathin films in the range of one to four monolayers was explored, and the films with one, three, and four FeCo monolayers preferred the in-plane easy axis of magnetization, while the film with two FeCo monolayers occupied the perpendicular anisotropy. In the presence of an electric field, the magnetic anisotropy energies for all four films could be enhanced; moreover, the transition of the easy axis of magnetization from in-plane to out-of-plane also could be obtained, and the transition electric field was related with their thickness. It could be found that the variation of the in-plane lattice constant resulted in the switching from the perpendicular to in-plane anisotropy for the film with two FeCo monolayers. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.
Source Title: Journal of Applied Physics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/75256
ISSN: 00218979
DOI: 10.1063/1.3672855
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

16
checked on Dec 4, 2018

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

14
checked on Nov 19, 2018

Page view(s)

52
checked on Dec 8, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.