Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/74845
Title: Dean flow fractionation (DFF) isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood
Authors: Bhagat, A.A.S.
Hou, H.W.
Li, L.D.
Lim, C.T. 
Han, J.
Keywords: Circulating tumor cells
Dean flows
Inertial forces
Spiral channels
Issue Date: 2011
Source: Bhagat, A.A.S.,Hou, H.W.,Li, L.D.,Lim, C.T.,Han, J. (2011). Dean flow fractionation (DFF) isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood. 15th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2011, MicroTAS 2011 1 : 524-526. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Isolation and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as cancer biomarkers have been challenging due to their extremely low abundance in blood. This paper reports an ultra high-throughput technique for CTCs isolation from blood using the inherent Dean vortex flows present in curvilinear channels, aptly termed Dean Flow Fractionation (DFF). Using a 2-inlet 2-outlet spiral microchannel, the separation principle exploits the difference in cell size between CTCs (~16-20 μm diameter) and other blood cells (RBCs ~8 μm; leukocytes ~8-14 μm). Experimental results confirm >99% RBCs and leukocytes removal from blood sample (20% hematocrit) spiked with MCF-7 cells with >90% tumor cell recovery after separation. The developed technique offers large sample processing capability due to its ability to process very high hematocrit samples (20%), a key requirement for isolating rare-cells. A single device can process 1 mL whole blood in a single step, under 15 min. Copyright © (2011) by the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society.
Source Title: 15th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2011, MicroTAS 2011
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/74845
ISBN: 9781618395955
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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