Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/74485
Title: An integrated bioreactor-activated carbon adsorption and polysulfone hollow fiber membrane cell immobilisation - For cometabolic transformation of 4-chlorophenol
Authors: Loh, K.C. 
Wang, Y.
Issue Date: 2006
Source: Loh, K.C.,Wang, Y. (2006). An integrated bioreactor-activated carbon adsorption and polysulfone hollow fiber membrane cell immobilisation - For cometabolic transformation of 4-chlorophenol. AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: A well-known cometabolism system is the biodegradation of phenol and 4-chlorophenol (4-cp) by Pseudomonas putida. In light of the inhibition effects of 4-cp on phenol degradation and the substrate inhibition of phenol at high concentrations in the cometabolic transformation of 4-cp, an integrated bioreactor system incorporating adsorption on granular activated carbon and hollow fiber membrane cell immobilization was fabricated and studied. Polysulfone hollow fiber membranes were used to immobilize the cells within the sponge-like porous regions, while activated carbon was provided to reduce the solution concentrations of the two substrates. Under batch operation of the bioreactor, simultaneous transformation of 1600 mg/L phenol and 200 mg/L 4-cp could be achieved. By immobilizing the cells in the hollow fiber membranes, the cells could tolerate much higher concentrations of both phenol and 4-cp. The bioreactor system could effectively remove 1000 mg/L phenol and 400 mg/L 4-cp at feed rates ≤ 40 mL/hr in the semi-continuous feed mode. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2006 AIChE Annual Meeting (San Francisco, CA 11/12-17/2006).
Source Title: AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/74485
ISBN: 081691012X
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