Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/74380
Title: Studies of rainfall-induced landslides in Thailand and Singapore
Authors: Jotisankasa, A.
Kulsawan, B.
Toll, D.G. 
Rahardjo, H.
Issue Date: 2008
Source: Jotisankasa, A.,Kulsawan, B.,Toll, D.G.,Rahardjo, H. (2008). Studies of rainfall-induced landslides in Thailand and Singapore. Unsaturated Soils: Advances in Geo-Engineering - Proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Unsaturated Soils, E-UNSAT 2008 : 901-907. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The paper reports on field, laboratory and computational studies of the mechanisms of rainfall-induced landslides carried out in Thailand and Singapore. Shallow landslides due to rainfall are common in both countries, as well as other parts of South East Asia. In both countries, field studies have been performed to monitor the changes in pore-water pressure resulting from rainfall infiltration. In Thailand, suctions have been measured using a new miniature tensiometer developed by Kasetsart University. In Singapore, commercially available "jet-fill" tensiometers were used. The observations include suction changes due to natural rainfall events and also using rainfall simulators to impose precipitation with controlled intensity and duration. The field data suggest the formation of a near-saturated zone along the slope surface (where most of the pore-water pressure changes take place) explains why many failures are shallow in nature (1-2 m deep). Experience in Thailand and Singapore shows many similarities between the mechanisms of failure and the paper highlights this common experience. © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, London.
Source Title: Unsaturated Soils: Advances in Geo-Engineering - Proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Unsaturated Soils, E-UNSAT 2008
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/74380
ISBN: 0415476925
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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