Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1006/jcis.2001.7508
Title: Electrostatic interaction and partitioning of ion-penetrable spheres
Authors: Chen, S.B. 
Tsao, H.-K.
Keywords: Electrical double layer
Electrostatic interactions
Ion-penetrable particles
Membranes
Partition coefficient
Issue Date: 15-Jun-2001
Source: Chen, S.B., Tsao, H.-K. (2001-06-15). Electrostatic interaction and partitioning of ion-penetrable spheres. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 238 (2) : 324-332. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1006/jcis.2001.7508
Abstract: Electrostatic interaction between two ion-penetrable spheres near a horizontal plate or in a slit pore is investigated theoretically. The orientation of the line connecting the two particle centers can be arbitrary relative to the plate(s). The electrostatic interaction energy and force on each particle are obtained analytically by the method of images. Emphasis is placed on the effect of the presence of the second particle, compared to the case of a single particle or the case without any plate(s). It is found that the horizontal electrical force on each particle is always repulsive. This repulsive force is enhanced by the plate(s) of constant surface charge density, while it is reduced by the plate(s) of constant surface potential. The electrostatic interaction together with the steric effect is used to determine the partition coefficient for the case of a slit pore, correct to O(C∞), where C∞ is the volume fraction of particles in the bulk solution. The positive correction coefficient is larger for conducting plates than for insulating plates. © 2001 Academic Press.
Source Title: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/66577
ISSN: 00219797
DOI: 10.1006/jcis.2001.7508
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