Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1680/geot.52.7.469.38750
Title: Cyclic settlement behaviour of spudcan foundations
Authors: Ng, T.G.
Lee, F.H. 
Keywords: Centrifuge modelling
Footings/foundations
Sands
Settlement
Soil/structure interaction
Issue Date: Sep-2002
Source: Ng, T.G., Lee, F.H. (2002-09). Cyclic settlement behaviour of spudcan foundations. Geotechnique 52 (7) : 469-480. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1680/geot.52.7.469.38750
Abstract: This paper examines the cyclic settlement behaviour of spudcan foundations in sand, using centrifuge model data. By means of a servo-electrohydraulic system, loading episodes comprising several thousand cycles of sinusoidal loading were applied to model spudcan foundations. The findings showed that, in dry sand, non-preloaded spudcans settle by penetration into the soil, resulting in a large increase in cyclic stiffness. In contrast, preloaded spudcans appear to settle by densification of the sand, leading to a smaller increase in cyclic stiffness. In saturated sand, where excess pore pressure can accumulate, the effects of preloading are less evident. A non-preloaded spudcan tends to generate a bulb of negative pore pressure around itself, conferring some apparent preloading on the near-field soil, and thereby resisting further penetration. In a preloaded model, the negative pore pressure bulb is smaller and surrounded by a zone of positive pore pressure. As the positive pore pressure propagates into the negative pore pressure bulb, the effective stress of the sand around the spudcan decreases, allowing further penetration. This is manifested as an apparent loss of preload. Thus non-preloaded and preloaded spudcans may settle by densification and penetration.
Source Title: Geotechnique
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/65373
ISSN: 00168505
DOI: 10.1680/geot.52.7.469.38750
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