Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/nag.599
Title: Application of enhanced assumed strain finite element method to predict collapse loads of undrained geotechnical problems
Authors: Zhou, X.X.
Chow, Y.K. 
Leung, C.F. 
Keywords: Axisymmetric footing
Collapse loads
Enhanced assumed strain
Strip footing
Undrained loading
Issue Date: Jul-2007
Source: Zhou, X.X., Chow, Y.K., Leung, C.F. (2007-07). Application of enhanced assumed strain finite element method to predict collapse loads of undrained geotechnical problems. International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics 31 (8) : 1033-1043. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/nag.599
Abstract: Many low-order displacement-based finite elements with exact integration are not suitable for estimating collapse loads of undrained geotechnical problems, especially for axisymmetric cases. As a result, higher-order elements have to be used for these situations. In this technical note, the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) finite element method proposed by Simo and Rifai for elasticity problems are extended to plasticity problems to determine collapse loads. The numerical results for the problem of a smooth rigid surface footing on a deep purely cohesive undrained soil layer are given. It is demonstrated that the four-noded quadrilateral EAS finite element is capable of estimating the collapse loads accurately for both undrained plane strain and axisymmetric problems. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Source Title: International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/65163
ISSN: 03639061
DOI: 10.1002/nag.599
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