Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/65094
Title: Adaptation of impactor for the split Hopkinson pressure bar in characterizing concrete at medium strain rate
Authors: Zhao, P. 
Lok, T.-S.
Keywords: Dynamic characteristics of concrete
Finite difference method
Impact
Split Hopkinson pressure bar
Strain rate effect
Issue Date: 20-Apr-2005
Source: Zhao, P.,Lok, T.-S. (2005-04-20). Adaptation of impactor for the split Hopkinson pressure bar in characterizing concrete at medium strain rate. Structural Engineering and Mechanics 19 (6) : 603-618. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique is widely used to characterize the dynamic mechanical response of engineering materials at high strain rates. In this paper, attendant problems associated with testing 70 mm diameter concrete specimens are considered, analysed and resolved. An adaptation of a conventional solid circular striker bar, as a means of achieving reliable and repeatable SHPB tests, is then proposed. In the analysis, a pseudo one-dimensional model is used to analyse wave propagation in a non-uniform striker bar. The stress history of the incident wave is then obtained by using the finite difference method. Comparison was made between incident waves determined from the simplified model, finite element solution and experimental data. The results show that the simplified method is adequate for designing striker bar shapes to overcome difficulties commonly encountered in SHPB tests. Using two specifically designed striker bars, tests were conducted on 70 mm diameter steel fibre reinforced concrete specimens. The results are presented in the paper.
Source Title: Structural Engineering and Mechanics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/65094
ISSN: 12254568
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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