Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/64008
Title: Heat removal from reverse flow reactors used in methane combustion
Authors: Balaji, S.
Lakshminarayanan, S. 
Keywords: Heat extraction
Logic based control
Methane combustion
Reverse flow reactor
Side feeding
Issue Date: Aug-2005
Source: Balaji, S.,Lakshminarayanan, S. (2005-08). Heat removal from reverse flow reactors used in methane combustion. Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering 83 (4) : 695-704. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The idea of using Reverse Flow Reactors (RFR) for methane reduction in exhausts has been well elucidated in the past. However, there are intricacies in such operations to maintain the ignited state of the reactor along with maintaining low outlet concentrations of methane. This is especially true under rich feed conditions where combustion reactions liberate more heat leading to possible catalyst deactivation. Under favourable conditions, it is possible to continuously extract heat from the RFR system-this is a viable way of maintaining acceptable thermal conditions in the reactor and consequently retaining catalyst activity. This paper elaborates upon the optimal amount of heat that can be removed from the system without losing the sustainability while preventing overheating of the catalyst bed. A simple event based control strategy is implemented for switching the inlet and outlet ports (flow reversal). Issues relating to the operation of reverse flow reactors with side feeding and the possibility of extraction of useful heat from such systems are also discussed. Methane combustion reaction and a continuous two dimensional heterogeneous model of the reactor have been employed in this study.
Source Title: Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/64008
ISSN: 00084034
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

Page view(s)

25
checked on Dec 7, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.