Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/63826
Title: Emerging membrane technologies developed in NUS for water reuse and desalination applications: Membrane distillation and forward osmosis
Authors: Teoh, M.M. 
Wang, K.Y. 
Bonyadi, S. 
Yang, Q. 
Chung, T.-S. 
Keywords: Desalination
Forward osmosis
Hollow fiber membranes
Membrane distillation
Nanofiltration
Separation
Issue Date: Jan-2011
Source: Teoh, M.M.,Wang, K.Y.,Bonyadi, S.,Yang, Q.,Chung, T.-S. (2011-01). Emerging membrane technologies developed in NUS for water reuse and desalination applications: Membrane distillation and forward osmosis. Membrane Water Treatment 2 (1) : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The deficiency of clean water is a major global concern because all the living creatures rely on the drinkable water for survival. On top of this, abundant of clean water supply is also necessary for household, metropolitan inhabitants, industry, and agriculture. Among many purification processes, advances in low-energy membrane separation technology appear to be the most effective solution for water crisis because membranes have been widely recognized as one of the most direct and feasible approaches for clean water production. The aim of this article is to give an overview of (1) two new emerging membrane technologies for water reuse and desalination by forward osmosis (FO) and membrane distillation (MD), and (2) the molecular engineering and development of highly permeable hollow fiber membranes, with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and polybenzimidazole (PBI) as the main focuses for the aforementioned applications in National University of Singapore (NUS). This article presents the main results of membrane module design, separation performance, membrane characteristics, chemical modification and spinning conditions to produce novel hollow fiber membranes for FO and MD applications. As two potential solutions, MD and FO may be synergistically combined to form a hybrid system as a sustainable alternative technology for fresh water production.
Source Title: Membrane Water Treatment
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/63826
ISSN: 20058624
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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