Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.32633
Title: Surface modification of PCL-TCP scaffolds in rabbit calvaria defects: Evaluation of scaffold degradation profile, biomechanical properties and bone healing patterns
Authors: Yeo, A.
Wong, W.J.
Teoh, S.-H. 
Keywords: Bone
Degradation
Polycaprolactone
Scaffold
Surface modification
Issue Date: 15-Jun-2010
Source: Yeo, A., Wong, W.J., Teoh, S.-H. (2010-06-15). Surface modification of PCL-TCP scaffolds in rabbit calvaria defects: Evaluation of scaffold degradation profile, biomechanical properties and bone healing patterns. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A 93 (4) : 1358-1367. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.32633
Abstract: Traditionally, polycaprolactone (PCL) based scaffolds tend to degrade at a slow rate. Pretreatment of polycaprolactone-20% tricalcium phosphate (PCL-TCP) scaffolds under alkaline conditions can be utilized to increase the degradation rate and improve mechanical properties. Three groups of PCL-TCP scaffolds with varying pretreatment exposures with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were studied in a rabbit calvaria defect model and analyzed at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. (Group A: Untreated, Group B: 3 M NaOH/48 h and Group C: 3 M NaOH/96 h). Micro-CT analysis demonstrated that scaffolds with increased surface roughness (Groups B and C) showed a greater impact on the overall volume loss during the early healing period between 2 and 8 weeks as compared to the untreated group. In addition, greater bone formation was detected in NaOH treated scaffolds as compared to the untreated group throughout the experiment. Scaffolds with increased surface roughness generally reported higher push out test and compressive strength values from 4 to 8 weeks of early healing. Interestingly, the mechanical properties displayed a decline in values from 12 weeks onwards in the modified groups suggesting a favorable breakdown or weakening of PCL-TCP scaffolds tailored for replacement by new bone formation. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Source Title: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/61430
ISSN: 15493296
DOI: 10.1002/jbm.a.32633
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