Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dental.2006.11.018
Title: Hydromechanics in dentine: Role of dentinal tubules and hydrostatic pressure on mechanical stress-strain distribution
Authors: Kishen, A. 
Vedantam, S. 
Keywords: Dentinal tubules
Dentine
Hydrostatic pressure
Strain
Stress
Water
Issue Date: Oct-2007
Source: Kishen, A., Vedantam, S. (2007-10). Hydromechanics in dentine: Role of dentinal tubules and hydrostatic pressure on mechanical stress-strain distribution. Dental Materials 23 (10) : 1296-1306. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dental.2006.11.018
Abstract: Objectives: This investigation is to understand the role of free water in the dentinal tubules on the mechanical integrity of bulk dentine. Methods: Three different experiments were conducted in this study. In experiment 1, three-dimensional models of dentine with gradient elastic modulus, homogenous elastic modulus, and with and without hydrostatic pressure were simulated using the finite element method. Static compressive loads of 15, 50 and 100 N were applied and the distribution of the principal stresses, von Mises stresses, and strains in loading direction were determined. In experiment 2, experimental compression testing of fully hydrated and partially dehydrated dentine (21 °C for 72 h) was conducted using a Universal testing machine. In experiment 3, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of hydrated and partially dehydrated dentine was carried out. Results: The finite element analysis revealed that the dentine model with simulated hydrostatic pressure displayed residual tensile stresses and strains in the inner region adjacent to the root canal. When external compressive loads were applied to the model, the residual stresses and strains counteracted the applied loads. Similarly the hydrated specimens subjected to experimental compression loads showed greater toughness when compared to the partially dehydrated specimens. The stress at fracture was significantly higher in partially dehydrated specimens (p = 0.014), while the strain at fracture was significantly higher in hydrated dentine specimens (p = 0.037). Significance: These experiments highlighted the distinct role of free water in the dentinal tubules and hydrostatic pressure on the stress-strain distribution within the bulk dentine. © 2006 Academy of Dental Materials.
Source Title: Dental Materials
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/60471
ISSN: 01095641
DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2006.11.018
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