Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.triboint.2009.05.015
Title: Application of micro-ball bearing on Si for high rolling life-cycle
Authors: Sinha, S.K. 
Pang, R.
Tang, X.
Keywords: Micro-ball bearing
Wear life-cycle
Issue Date: Jan-2010
Source: Sinha, S.K., Pang, R., Tang, X. (2010-01). Application of micro-ball bearing on Si for high rolling life-cycle. Tribology International 43 (1-2) : 178-187. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.triboint.2009.05.015
Abstract: In this paper, we introduce a new class of micro-ball bearing that can be applied between two Si surfaces in relative motion where wear is a problem. Wide channel was created on one Si plate for all the ball bearings to roll within this channel rather than in individual grooves. This type of micro-bearings can be applied as friction reducers to micro- and nano-machines. The tribometer set-up consisted of a top plate (Si wafer), which was connected to a conventional bearing, resting on a bottom plate (also Si wafer) that was rotated at 300 and 500 RPM by a DC motor. Borosilicate glass micro-spheres, 53±3.7 μm in diameter, were rotated between the two circular silicon plates (15 mm diameter) under a dead weight of 235 μN and in high-humidity conditions (75% relative humidity (RH)). Tests on the plate with wide channel consistently exceeded 1 million cycles of rotation without failure of the bearing. The main factors affecting the life-cycle are identified as the presence of a wide channel, ball dispersion, and alignment of the Si plates. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Tribology International
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/59562
ISSN: 0301679X
DOI: 10.1016/j.triboint.2009.05.015
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